School District Spotlight

District:          Henry County Schools
Industry:        Education
Location:        Henry County, Georgia
Vehicles:         Blue Bird propane buses (23)
Fueling:          On-site propane autogas station

We recently collaborated with Superior Energy Systems on a case study with a new twist — more information about a customer’s experience with propane infrastructure. As with our other case studies, it also covers the school district’s experience with cost-effective propane buses. Here’s a summary of Henry County Schools’ testimony.Henry County Schools Case Study

Henry County Schools in Georgia was concerned with bus maintenance requirements. This led the district to replace an aging diesel fleet with emissions-reducing propane autogas.

The district first purchased 14 gasoline-powered buses, then made the move in 2019 to propane models. Henry County Schools’ decision was supported by reports of positive experiences with propane from nearby Georgia school districts. The decision to go with propane was solidified when ROUSH CleanTech hosted a group of district staff at its facility in Livonia, Michigan. “Once district technicians visited ROUSH CleanTech for technical training, they were sold on the idea,” said the district’s transportation director.

Henry County Schools purchased 23 Blue Bird Vision Propane buses to replace aging diesel buses. The propane buses rolled out for the start of the 2019-2020 school year.

With a limited number of public stations nearby, the district built a propane fueling station at its onsite transportation facility. Propane stations cost less to build than any other fuel source, including diesel, gasoline, CNG and electric. Superior Energy Systems provided the district’s fuel infrastructure, which included two propane autogas dispensers and an 18,000-gallon skidded tank. The company’s equipment was compatible with the district’s existing fueling infrastructure set-ups.

With the addition of propane buses to its fleet, Henry County Schools cuts harmful emissions and greenhouse gases, which benefits both student health and the community’s air quality. Clean-operating propane produces no particulate matter and extremely low levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx), and emits fewer greenhouse gases and smog-producing hydrocarbons. The district’s propane buses emit 500 fewer pounds of particulate matter per year and about 19,000 fewer pounds of NOx annually compared to the 23 diesel buses they replaced (which were 1995 to 2006 model years).

As propane buses roll out in Henry County, drivers are happy to make the switch. They received training on how to operate the propane buses and commented on the buses’ powerful engine. The schools’ entire transportation department expects the buses will be reliable for the long haul, and plans to switch all of its buses to propane over the next decade.

For the full case study, click here.